Make your own on-screen jigsaw puzzles
Jan11

Make your own on-screen jigsaw puzzles

Thanks to Peter Bryenton for his comment on my Big Huge Labs post yesterday for pointing me towards this website that allows you to turn any of your images into a drag and drop jigsaw. You can embed the code into your blog/VLE or just link direct to the page. Try it out with one of your own images, and then try and put it back together on your IWB! Thanks also to Clare Seccombe for sending me this link to another site for creating jigsaws: http://www.jigsawplanet.com/...

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Creative Commons Image Sources for your IWB
Oct28

Creative Commons Image Sources for your IWB

You can’t beat a powerful image to add punch to your lesson. Whether you want something to put up to draw questions from the class or just to add extra emphasis to a presentation. I’ve written about this before – and linked to a few good sources of images such as The Big Picture. To help find creative commons images, there are several tools now which will let you search Flickr for CC images. My Favourite is FlickrCC – enter a tag to search for and it will return a load thumbnails. Click on a thumbnail to see more information and to visit the original page on Flickr. Other search engines which trawl Flickr include: Compfight : http://www.compfight.com/ FlickrStorm : http://www.zoo-m.com/flickr-storm/ Simple Flickr CC Search : http://johnjohnston.info/flickrCC/index.php Flickr Creative Commons Search : http://flickr.com/creativecommons/ Remember to credit the original source of the image when you use it. I usually copy and past the full URL to the source image – you could also give the Flickr user name. If you can’t find the image on Flickr, it’s well worth checking again in the future. About 5000 images get uploaded to Flickr every minute, so there’s a chance something more suitable will be there next time you check. Some other sources of images include: Geograph : A project to take photographs of every map square in the UK. Useful for finding photos of your local environment. And if there’s not many there, would be a good idea for a project to take some!  http://www.Geograph.org.uk PhotoEverywhere : Photos from all around the world. http://photoeverywhere.co.uk/ E2Bn Gallery : A community resource made by the educational community for the educational community. Worth a look. http://gallery.nen.gov.uk/gallery-e2bn.html Animal photos : Does what it says on the tin. Photos of animals. http://animalphotos.info/a/ The Open Clip Art Library : A good source of clip art resources. Registration required, but it’s free. http://openclipart.org/ You can also use the advanced image search feature of Google Image Search to get it to check for licences and only return images that are covered for reuse, or commercial use. Go to Image Search and look for the “advanced search” button. Or click here. The creative commons website also lists a stack of other image sites here : but I haven’t checked them all out. You can also use the search engine provided by Creative Commons.org : http://search.creativecommons.org/ You can also use the Wikimedia Commons, plenty of images there that are covered by a creative commons licence : http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page Remember to check the licence of any image you want to use. On Flickr, it’s pretty obvious – look below the tag list and you...

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Make easy screenshots with Aviary
Jul05

Make easy screenshots with Aviary

Here’s a new website that will make it easier to take screenshots of other sites to save to your desktop or to embed into your blog or your wiki. It’s called Aviary. And it’s a neat, free, image editing application. You can create images from scratch, and share them with others online. But as well as that, it has a screen capture feature. If you use Firefox you can get “Talon” an Aviary plug in that puts a small button onto your toolbar. Just click that button and select the area you want to grab. You then get the option to save that image to your desktop, copy to the clipboard or have it hosted on Aviary to easily embed online. Like this: Which was a pretty painless way of grabbing a section of my Twitter page. You need to sign up for an Aviary account, but it was free to do so (there are pricing plans for more advanced use of the site) Aviary also lets you edit and manipulate images online once you’ve captured them – or upload your own images to edit. As well as the Firefox button, Aviary has just launched it’s easiest feature yet! You can capture any webpage at all, from any browser, by simply putting Aviary.com/ in front of the URL! For example, say you want to capture Google’s homepage: Just change http://www.google.com to Aviary.com/http://google.com. Very simple. Edit – if you like this – Lifehacker has just reviewed the Five Best Online Image Editors, and Aviary is on the list, along with Sumo Paint, Photoshop Express, Pixlr and Picnik. I’d probably also add Splashup to the list....

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