Augmented Reality Animals, Dinosaurs and Space Apps From Octagon Studios
Oct06

Augmented Reality Animals, Dinosaurs and Space Apps From Octagon Studios

Augmented Reality is the term used by apps which overlay content on top of real world objects. Imagine viewing a textbook page through your iPad and the pictures come to life with sound and animations. This can have some great educational uses. From bringing spacecraft or animals into the classroom, to bringing storybooks to life with 3D models. While investigating new Augmented Reality apps for a workshop I was planning, I stumbled...

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Exploring the Universe in No Man’s Sky
Aug17

Exploring the Universe in No Man’s Sky

As you may have noticed from the lack of blogposts, I’m having a bit of summer downtime. And inbetween long bouts of sitting in front of the Olympics (go Team GB!) I’ve spent the last week exploring the universe in No Man’s Sky. No Man’s Sky is a new game for PC and PS4. In it you take the role of a nameless space traveller, zooming around the universe. The game is huge, there are over 18 quintillion planets...

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Quick Science Idea : Oreo Cookie Moon Phase Model
Jul04

Quick Science Idea : Oreo Cookie Moon Phase Model

Here’s a quick idea for making a model of the phases of the moon using Oreo cookies. Other cookies might work too, but the combination of black biscuit and white cream makes this work really well. Carefully remove the top of each of the cookies to reveal the cream layer. You can then scrape away the cream to show the different moon phases. Place them in a circle, then annotate with labels to explain the different phases. Like...

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50 Essential Tools for any Science Teaching Toolkit
May05

50 Essential Tools for any Science Teaching Toolkit

One of my main roles is as a Primary Science lecturer, training student teachers to become great science teachers, or to at least to overcome the fear of science they developed in high school! Over the course of a year I fire plenty of useful websites and apps at them that they should check out. One of my students asked if I had a handy list of all of them in one place and I realised I hadn’t collated them for a while. So here...

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Explore the Moon with ESA’s Interactive Guide
Apr25

Explore the Moon with ESA’s Interactive Guide

ESA’s Interactive Moon guide is a new interactive website launched by the European Space Agency to explore questions about lunar exploration and explain what future moon missions may entail. From radio telescopes on the far side of the Moon to how Earth’s natural satellite formed, the interactive documentary is a comprehensive guide. It features interviews with real lunar scientists from all over Europe as well as a timeline of...

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In Space, Everyone Can Hear You Tweet
Feb01

In Space, Everyone Can Hear You Tweet

One of the important things about science is that it is not a fixed subject. New scientific discoveries are being made all the time. It’s important that students learn that scientists do not know everything. We make the best guesses that we can using the best information available at the time, and as new information comes in our understanding and models can change. The working scientifically strand of the science curriculum require...

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Project Apollo Moon Photo Archive Released
Oct05

Project Apollo Moon Photo Archive Released

If you’re teaching a topic about Space, then this new image archive is going to be very useful! Pretty much every image captured by the Apollo astronauts on their lunar missions have now been added to the Project Apollo Archive Flickr account. There are over 11,000 photographs, each one painstakingly digitized and restored for this fantastic project. The images provide a fabulous record of life on the Apollo craft on their way...

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Compare the Size of the Planets with this Handy Site
Aug03

Compare the Size of the Planets with this Handy Site

A quick webtool for a Monday morning. Planet Compare is a handy site for science teachers who want to demonstrate the relative size of each of the planets in our solar system. The tool includes 3d models of all 8 planets, plus Pluto and the Sun. Simply click on the first planet, then the second to see them side by side. You can also double-click anywhere on planet 1 to “stick” the other planet onto its surface –...

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Track the Planets with this Solar System Orrery
Aug02

Track the Planets with this Solar System Orrery

This Solar System Orrery by Jeroen Gommers provides a top-down view of the solar system so you can observe how the planets move relative to each other. The orbits and size of the planets has been squashed to make it fit onto the screen, but their relative motion are accurate. In reality their orbits are elliptical as well, rather than circular as shown in this model. Drag any planet around to see how the other planets move. The...

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Explore the Sun with the DIY Sun Science iPad App
Apr20

Explore the Sun with the DIY Sun Science iPad App

DIY Sun Science for iPad allows children (and teachers!) to investigate and learn about the Sun, using live footage, archive images and practical activity ideas. The app was developed by UC Berkeley’s The Lawrence Hall of Science in association with NASA. The observatory module allows children to view live (or very recent) images of the Sun from NASA’s SDO satellite. They can select images taken using different wavelengths of light...

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App-vent Day 18 : Tour Space with Solar System Scope
Dec18

App-vent Day 18 : Tour Space with Solar System Scope

Solar System Scope is an excellent interactive 3D Model of our Solar System for the iPad. You can switch between a heliocentric view, geocentric view or a panoramic view of the Solar System. Earth-centred view is great if you then use the play controls to move the time forwards as you can see the how day/night changes across the surface. Heliocentric view is good for showing how we get seasons as well as demonstrating the movement of...

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Track Comet ISON on your whiteboard with this interactive model
Aug15

Track Comet ISON on your whiteboard with this interactive model

You might already have heard of Comet ISON, but if you haven’t then hopefully you’ll be hearing a lot more about it soon. Comet ISON is heading this way and although it is too early to tell just yet, it is hoped that it will be very bright and light up the night sky in October/November 2013. It should be easily visible with the naked eye. The clever folks behind Solar System Scope have put together an interactive 3D model...

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